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Initiatives at the Production Stage

Reduction of CO2 Emissions

Since 2007, Akebono has engaged in energy conservation and CO2 reduction projects, upgrading equipment and reducing energy usage at all our facilities.

Akebono's CO2 emission volume in fiscal 2015 (Akebono Group Worldwide) was 263,200 tons, down 1.0% year on year. We thus achieved our target of a decrease of at least 1%.

Total CO2 Emission and CO2 Emissions per Net Sales (Akebono Group Worldwide)

Total CO2 Emission and CO2 Emissions per Net Sales
  • * From 2011, AEC and ABC have been included in the scope of calculation for emissions from North American locations.

Water Use Reduction

Akebono considers reduction of water use to be of paramount importance, and in 1995 assessing the volume of water resources used as well as making efforts to reduce the usage were designated as important management areas. In addition to improving the effectiveness of resource use, reducing water consumption also contributes to the reduction of the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere through the use of water pumping and purification equipment.

As a result of our efforts, not only in controlling water usage and its reuse, but also in managing and optimization of water used in for cooking and other non-industrial purposes. We will continue to proactively implement further initiatives to decrease the environmental load by reducing both water use and drainage generation.

Water Resource Usage and Water Resource Usage per Net Sales (Akebono Group Worldwide)

Water Resource Usage and Water Resource Usage per Net Sales

Continuation and Improvement of Zero Emission Initiatives

In order to eliminate waste material generated by our business, Akebono continuously promotes zero emission initiatives. In 2004, we achieved our goal of no landfill disposal of industrial waste in our main domestic locations. Zero emission goals promoted by Akebono (no direct landfill disposal or incineration) have been achieved by Akebono Brake Sanyo Manufacturing Co. Ltd. in March 2006 and by Akebono Brake Iwaki Manufacturing Co. Ltd. in February 2007, marking the successful implementation of the zero emission plan in all our facilities.

Akebono will keep contributing to the creation of a recycling-oriented society and will continue the research in efficient usage of recycled resources as well as reduction of waste disposal costs and optimization of disposal methods. In addition, we keep strengthening our efforts to achieve the goal of no emissions while further promoting “reduce, reuse, recycle” - the basic objective behind the zero emission concept.

Continued to accomplish zero emissions through disposal methods with low environmental impact such as the recycling of sand into raw material for cement which the Company started in 2010 through outsourcing.

Waste Generated in Fiscal 2015 (primary operations in Japan)

Waste Generated in Fiscal 2015

Fiscal 2015 Volume of Waste Generated and Recycling Ratio (major operations in Japan)

Since fiscal 2007, we eliminated landfill waste completely.
  • Since fiscal 2007, we eliminated landfill waste completely.

Change in Total Volume of Waste Generated and Recycling Ratio (major operations in Japan)

Change in Total Volume of Waste Generated and Recycling Ratio
  • * Total volume of waste generated includes resources of value, such as metals.
  • * Figures represent data from eight locations, with Tatebayashi Foundry being included in the calculation from fiscal 2009.

Karakuri Project

Reviewing a design's energy efficiency

The Karakuri Project aims to save energy and reduce equipment failure by creating a facility that requires no input energy (uses little or no energy) and enables concurrent motion (multiple motions powered by a single driver). Karakuri is a traditional handicraft in Japan involving the creation of mechanically driven (clockwork) automata, such as tea-serving dolls and tools.

Production engineering is a field that requires combinations of different areas of specialization. It is necessary to understand the particular qualities and characteristics of each type of facility when considering design, such as raw materials in the case of compounding facilities or coating materials in the case of coating facilities.

By applying a karakuri approach, powering multiple movements with one driving force, manufacturing facilities can be made truly forward-thinking and ground-breaking. The difficulty of the karakuri approach is its complexity and the wide variety of similar components involved. The standardization of components is key to addressing this problem as is the standardization and streamlining of processing operations.

Going forward, Akebono will implement energy-saving facilities utilizing karakuri technology first in Japan, then globally.